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The AWD adjust automatically the torque needed to the front or rear or 4 wheel depending on the need .. if you are cruising at more then let say 60 m/h all the torque goes to the rear.. why? For economical reasons.. you burn less fuel
However if you drive quite dynamic in small roads you will see the torque changing all the time depending the needs
 

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The AWD adjust automatically the torque needed to the front or rear or 4 wheel depending on the need .. if you are cruising at more then let say 60 m/h all the torque goes to the rear.. why? For economical reasons.. you burn less fuel
However if you drive quite dynamic in small roads you will see the torque changing all the time depending the needs
So even if my car drivetrain is AWD it permanently drives in RWD and only AWD by itself automatically? How does that make sense? Isnt that fraud?
 

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I wonder if they were using snow tires during that video; either way great video of what she's capable of.
It's surprising how well the car handles. For me, I have tried the car with Pirelli Sotto 3 snow tires in a heavy snow storm around my area and it did nicely in fresh snow. The only problem is how low the car is and the front air deflectors and grill becomes a plow in deeper snow / drifts.
 

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2018 Maserati Ghibli SQ4
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Very few vehicles, other than trucks and some Jeeps with transfer cases, are permanent fulltime AWD. I think Audi comes closest. Most run either FWD or RWD, and then engage the opposing axle when they need more traction. Because of that torque and grip transfer, it can make for an interesting ride if you hit icy spots. My A6 and A4 would kick traction to the tires not on ice, with interesting effects such as pull. But in 4-12" of snow, they drove amazing. I drove the Ghibli from CT to MI last week through a PA snowstorm and it ran great on the highway at 70+. The only problem I had was the FWC radar got covered by ice and kept turning off the cruise, so I eventually disabled it from the MTC+.
 

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I have a Ghibli SQ4 and I’m finding that the torque distribution is almost always in the rear through winter weather roads. The only time I see an all-wheel-drive is when I’m stopped, and taking off from stop sign or stop light. This is 100% deceiving calling this car all wheel drive when it rarely ever is. So now I’m basically stuck in Michigan driving a rear wheel car. Awesome.
 

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After I bought new tires, I spent some time looking at the torque distribution in the center control panel and you are correct, there is a slight shift to front wheels (maybe 15-85) then back to full RWD on dry roads. It has been a couple years since I drove it in snow, but I recall being in some slippery conditions in PA and I could feel the front end helping pull me out. So it does operate in AWD.

To clarify, I decided to keep my Audi for winter driving and the Maserati is garaged to avoid ice and salt. The Audi (both my old A6 and current A4) are spectacular in packed snow and powder up to about 8-10". From my little experience with the Ghibli, it should be almost as good. It is **** well heavy enough.

Where in Michigan are you? Here in southwest MI I generally deal with 80-100" of snow a year.
 

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Which is weird because I couldn’t feel the front end really helping too much at all, but maybe it’s because I was on non-dry Road. The Roads were more wet and a little slushy all the way to ice or snow covered. I too am in Southwest Michigan. And if that’s the case you were driving in this bull crap yesterday/last night too! Lol. I thought for sure I was gonna get into a car accident. My back end was sliding all over the place. the biggest thing that We are gonna do first is get different tires. But even with different all season/winter tires, I don’t see how it’s gonna help a whole lot if the torque distribution is always still in the back
 

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You will have plenty of opportunity to evaluate over the next few days. Leave your center information center on the torque distribution and [carefully] glance at it when you start off or feel the wheels slipping. Take it to a road with no traffic and accelerate harder than normal and see what it tells you.

There is no question that good all-season tires make a huge difference no matter what the car. Even older "good" tires with only half tread are not as good for traction. I recently went with Michelin Pilot Sport All Seasons. Expensive but highly rated for wet and snow, even if they won't see much snow. If it helps, I obtained a quote for them at Belle Tire and used it to price match at Discount Tire, my preferred dealer. I bought slightly oversize and they set me back about $1700. Good luck.
 

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Tires make all the difference. As I indicated earlier in this thread my SQ 4 drove fine in snow with Pirelli Sotto 3 tires. My biggest problem is deep unplowed roads in my area, because the Ghibli is too low ... it becomes a plow! On snowy roads, the SQ4 handles as well as my 5 series BMW with winter Blizzaks.
On an early snow squall running stock non all season Pirelli's tires the traction was pretty bad, (sled comes to mind). I convert to winter set-up in October just to be safe.
 

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I was curious so checked my distribution today on dry roads, (rear : front). My SQ4 is definitely using the full range of distribution.
  1. Normal straight flat out driving the car tends to hover between 85:15 to 70:30.
  2. Acceleration from stop, around town and curvy back roads: 50:50 to 75:25
  3. Foot off accelerator 100% rear
 
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