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A short installation guide for rear parking/reversing sensors on a 2015 Ghibli (likely identical to any other MY). While there are lots of videos on sensor installation in general, I could not find specifics related to the Ghibli – notably sensor placement, passage of wires through trunk and isolation of reversing bulb wire. And – do they work any good? Also unsure the percentage of Ghiblis that came without sensors, but if yours didn’t, its worth having.


The kit I used came with four sensors, a control box and the beeper. I was not looking for any more visual feedback beyond the stock camera – or mounting anything forward of the trunk. My kit is simply called ‘Parking Sensor’, purchased on Amazon. There are several colors to choose from – my Ghibli finish is ‘grigio’, and the grey color is an extremely close match. I used touch-up paint to get closer but if I did it over again I would just leave them as is.



The paint had no effect on the function or sensitivity of the sensors. My only other concern was if they would stick out too far and look ugly; while they are not perfectly flush, they sit roughly 1mm above the surface of the bumper and do not look any different from the sensors you’d see on any other vehicle.


I did not remove the bumper and only an edge of trunk rubber seal, as well as one tail light assembly (I went with the passenger side). This procedure is described in several places; two Torx 30 bolts are accessed behind a smooth plastic cover. The third attachment point is through an access panel on the upper inside – reach past the trunk spring, through a hole and you will find a large plastic post threaded onto the forward edge of the tail light. Simply unscrew by hand and the tail light is then only attached by the harness connector (flick up the clip on the bottom and pull off – possible to complete these steps without removing, but there is a risk of the hanging assembly damaging your finish).
Time to measure and drill sensor holes. A large foam square was used - pressed over the back of the drill bit between bit and drill - to help protect the bumper plastic around the hole in case the drill made contact. As careful and slow as I was going, some contact is likely as the hole is completed. The foam mitigated any inadvertent scrapes.




Also, the tool provided is a horribly crude and wobbly implement, but I drilled a few test holes and it made a clean cut that matched the sensor width. Still, I first used a regular drill bit to make the initial guide holes before using the provided tool to cut the sensor hole.


There is lots of space behind bumper – the actual steel bumper takes up the bottom two thirds of the plastic bumper cover. Based on pictures of Ghibli bumpers with factory sensors, I measured roughly 1.5” down from the top edge for the middle two, each inside from the reflector edge by 9”. Outside sensors are roughly a half inch below the bottom edge of the reflector and 1.5” to the side.
Fish wire through holes with something long and bendable – I used a sturdy wire, and when I needed a bit more length, a zip tie taped to the end worked great. Also, I found it easier to fish the driver side wire first to the next hole over, then the next hole over, then down to the trunk access hole.



I found an existing harness wire coming through into the trunk just aft of the battery (this probably took the most time of the whole process as I did not want to drill a new hole and risk water intrusion). These wires came through a large rubber grommet; just pull out the grommet to fish the wires, then poke a hole in the middle and feed the four sensor wires through this grommet and reinsert.


Instructions indicate to order the sensors A, B, C, D – I doubt it makes any difference, but the control box has these letters so I labeled each sensor connector end accordingly, driver to passenger side. This may make it easier to troubleshoot in the future if there’s a problem as well.
Testing the tail light wires with a grounded probe identified the reversing light as being the grey wire with a green stripe (on one side of the connector). The red power wire from the sensor control box is clipped onto this wire using a connector clip or splice – you can run the wire behind the trunk liner and there is a hole just above and forward of the tail light which provides access to the tail harness wires.



The black/red ground wire I gently separated from the power wire and found a large bracket bolt in the trunk to ground the control box (note, in the photo the ground wire appears red, but for this kit it was black with a red stripe).


All plugged in and buttoned up, I tested the system function before pressing sensors completely in bumper, and securing the loose wires and beeper. There are hi, low and off switch settings available on the beeper. At high, I found the volume of the beep just right, and the tone of the sound was not annoying. A single beep sounds when reverse is selected. Then silence until you are roughly 1.5m from an object. Coincidentally (or not), the single beeps matched the green zone of the Ghibli camera markings. The double beep matched the yellow zone and the more intense beeping began at the red, indicating roughly 1 foot remaining to the object. When pushing sensors flush, note orientation in package instructions. Wires were finally bundled and left in the ample room under the trunk liner. A double-stick foam pad came with the kit and this was used to secure the beeper inside the sub-woofer space inside the trunk.


The process took roughly 3 hours, not including time researching and test painting. Now that the guesswork is gone, it is possible to do it all again in under an hour.
 

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Wow. I am very impressed with your work and determination, but disappointed it was not standard on the car to begin with. My mother lives in the US and has a 2000 Bentley Arnage which had parking sensors as standard. Yet when she bought a new S class Merc a few years ago she was shocked that it did not have parking sen and that it was an option. I told her to get my advice before buying! It’s just a way for manufacturers to make money on hugely overpriced options. Until about 20 years ago, the radio/stereo was an option in all Mercedes models In Europe - this is not a joke. Like you were going to read a book while driving, no need for a radio or stereo!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thx. I didn't mind the effort, except the angst associated with drilling into the bumper. Yes, strange not to be standard these days, esp when the technology is old and the components are cheap (for me the camera alone is not helpful enough). Though a small item, it is also a feature that greatly enhances one's confidence in operating the vehicle. When these first began showing up, I treated it as unnecessary electronic gimmickry. But after getting used to hearing it it has become something necessary I rely on without having to think about it.
 
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